Question: What does Sok mean in Khmer?

Is Sok a Cambodian name?

Sok is a fairly common surname and can be found throughout the Korean peninsula. Cambodian: unexplained.

What does Oum Mean in Cambodian?

Oum/ pou (omm/ puu)/ Aunty/ uncle

Respect plays a major role in Cambodian society, and this is often reflected in the way people are addressed. Elders automatically command respect from those younger than them, and rather than being referred to as bong, they will be called aunty or uncle – oum or pou.

What is the most common last name in Cambodia?

Most Common Last Names In Cambodia

Rank Surname Incidence
1 Sok 227,594
2 Chan 219,516
3 Chea 217,800
4 San 212,054

How do you address a Cambodian name?

Cambodians generally address friends and family according to relationship or age, followed by their given name. For example, someone may address SOTH Sopheap as ‘Ta Sopheap’ (grandfather Sopheap), ‘Pu Sopheap’ (uncle Sopheap) or ‘Bong Sopheap’ (brother Sopheap) depending on their age relative to the person.

What does JKJ mean in Khmer?

It’s a Khmer swear word which means “Song or daughter of the b*tch”. People use it to curse someone they hate, or sometimes they like to use it with people close to them.

Does Ming mean aunt?

In an informal situation, Cambodians will refer to an older man as Ta (grandfather), Po (uncle) or Bang (brother) and to an older woman as Yeay (grandmother), Ming (aunt) or Bang Srey (sister).

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How do you greet someone in Khmer?

The formal greeting in Khmer is “Choum reap sor” and should be said while sampeahing. (The more informal “Susaday” is reserved for casual situations and does not involve a sampeah.) “Choum reap lear” is the formal good-bye.

How do you greet in Khmer language?

Basic Khmer greetings and essentials

  1. Chom reap sour [chom-reap-sore] – Hello (formal)
  2. Susadei [soos-a-day] – Hello (informal)
  3. Soksaby [soks-a-bye] – How are you and I am fine.
  4. Chom reap lear [chom-reep-lear] – Goodbye (formal)
  5. Lee hi [lee-hi] – Goodbye (informal)
  6. Bah [bah] – Yes (male)
  7. Jah [chaa] – Yes (female)