Quick Answer: Why is my Vietnamese mint dying?

How do you bring a mint plant back to life?

Water the mint as frequently as required to keep the soil moist and the mint should recover from a wilted appearance in a few days. It is also important to plant mint in pots with drainage holes in the base which allows excess water to escape and prevent root rot.

Do you cut back Vietnamese mint?

How and when to prune Vietnamese mint. Harvest for the kitchen regularly, and prune the plant back by at least half in late winter or early spring, after all likelihood of frost has past.

What is killing my mint?

Here is a list of potential mint pests with some telltale signs that they are damaging your plants. Spider Mites: Leaves speckled with yellow spots & thin webbing. Loopers: Missing or large holes in foliage. Flea Beetles: Clusters of small holes in foliage. Aphids: Small winged & wingless insects on leaves.

How do you know if mint is overwatered?

Signs of Overwatering

An overwatered mint plant has yellowing leaves, weak stems and appears droopy. It’s also more susceptible to diseases such as mint rust, powdery mildew, black stem rot, verticillium wilt, leaf blight and white mold stem rot. Remove damaged areas of the mint plant if the problem persists.

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Is Vietnamese mint the same as Thai basil?

Vietnamese mint smells similar to Thai basil but it is far more pungent with a hot bite and slight numbing character and a strong alkalinity. Also known as hot mint, it is the leaf to use in Malaysian laksa soups, and is often simply known as laksa leaf. It’s also used as a salad ingredient, and cooked dishes.

What does Vietnamese mint taste like?

Vietnamese mint looks great in the garden and tastes like a sly blend of fresh coriander, lime-leaf and green chilli. After fresh basil, Vietnamese mint (Persicaria odorata) is my favourite culinary herb.