What happened Vietnam deserters?

How many US soldiers went AWOL in Vietnam?

Approximately 50,000 American servicemen deserted during the Vietnam War.

What was the punishment for desertion during the Vietnam War?

The most likely charge is desertion, which carries a maximum penalty of five years in prison.

Did any American soldiers stay in Vietnam after the war?

It’s estimated that tens of thousands of veterans have returned to Vietnam since the 1990s, mostly for short visits to the places where they once served. Decades after the fall of Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) many former soldiers still wonder why they were fighting.

Did any Americans defect to Vietnam?

Only a handful American servicemen are believed to have defected to the communists during the Vietnam War. … Officially labelled a defector by the Pentagon, many suspected Nolan, an African American, changed sides after suffering a lifetime of racial discrimination.

Are deserters still shot?

Eight decades on from the end of the First World War, the 306 British soldiers shot for desertion are still dishonoured, still shamed, still the subject of the official disapproval of Her Majesty’s Government.

Is going AWOL a felony?

The key difference between them is that AWOL/UA is a misdemeanor, while desertion is a felony that assumes the missing soldier abandoned the service with the intent never to return.

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Is going AWOL a crime?

As a federal warrant is issued for your arrest once you are AWOL more than 30 days, you could be arrested at any time. If this occurs, you will be held in a local jail until you are transferred to a military jail, where you will remain until you have a military court date, which could take some time.

How many deserters were shot in ww2?

In the event, the Americans shot only one deserter, the luckless Private Eddie Slovik, executed in France in January 1945.

What does desertion mean?

1 : an act of deserting especially : the abandonment without consent or legal justification of a person, post, or relationship and the associated duties and obligations sued for divorce on grounds of desertion. 2 : a state of being deserted or forsaken.